Aurora’s History and Purpose

A CENTURY OF SERVICE

Aurora of CNY has a long history of providing individual rehabilitation, support and employment services, along with professional Interpreter Referral Services through the Marjorie Clere Interpreter Referral Service. Aurora of CNY is the only area non-profit organization dedicated exclusively to promoting independence and opportunity for people of all ages with vision or hearing loss.

 


Original home of The Lighthouse at 505 Catherine St. Syracuse

1917:             Syracuse Association of Workers for the Blind was established to provide opportunities for people who were blind to be self-supporting. Federal legislation (the National Defense Act and Smith-Hughes Act) made funding available to provide vocational education through designated community agencies.

The creation of the organization was spearheaded by John C. Fowler.  He was described as a highly educated man who was actively involved in advocating the use of  a Uniform Type System, as an alternative to the then emerging system of Braille.  Mr. Fowler, blind from birth, attended the New York State School for the Blind and graduated from Syracuse University in 1908 with honors in just three years, and worked for Syracuse University as a piano tuner.

During the 1920’s, the agency expanded its mission to provide employment and social opportunities for anyone in the community who was blind or visually impaired. A wide variety of items such as rugs, mats, wicker work, jigsaw puzzles, and towels were sold at community Christmas bazaars to help support the workshop.

1926:             Syracuse Association of Workers for the Blind, also known as “The Lighthouse,” begins to receive Community Chest (United Way) funds and expanded its mission to provide employment and social opportunities for anyone in the community who was blind or visually impaired.

1938:             Syracuse Association of Workers for the Blind establishes a layman's committee composed business and industrial leaders who will endeavor to further the employment of blind and partly blind persons. Executive Secretary Bertha Armstrong also recommended that the organization form county auxiliary groups in various communities for the purpose of serving as contacting points between association services and blind persons in places outside of the city.

Mrs. Armstrong visited all blind persons in the county and made a complete record of each case, with a home teacher assigned to the association by the New York State Commission for the Blind. Upon the basis of these findings the association, in cooperation with social and health agencies, will endeavor to meet special needs.

1941:             Syracuse Association of Workers for the Blind purchased a new home for The Lighthouse at 425 James Street to accommodate more space for workers and for demonstrations and social events.

1950s:             As well as selling workshop items made by the blind, Syracuse Association of Workers for the Blind often offered demonstrations of talking book machines, seeing-eye dogs, instruction in reading and writing of Braille, and advocacy for blind and handicap workers.

1965:             As the result of changing community attitudes and in response to a study commissioned by the Board of Directors, AURORA’s sheltered workshop was merged with two other sheltered workshops to form Consolidated Industries of Greater Syracuse. Its social programs were merged into the Salvation Army’s Golden Age Center, as well.

At the same time, The Lighthouse began offering more specialized direct services to individuals with vision loss including social work, instruction in adapted daily living skills (rehabilitation teaching) and safe and independent travel training (orientation and mobility).

1976:             In the mid-1970’s, a study was conducted to identify the needs of members of the community who were Deaf.  As a result, in 1976, The Central New York Association of the Hearing Impaired (CNYAHI) was established as a sister agency to the Lighthouse. There were two separate Boards of Directors and two separate program staffs, with a single shared administrative staff.

1979:             CNYAHI established its Interpreter Referral Service, named after Marjorie Clere, a pioneering professional interpreter and advocate for the Deaf community, to meet the growing demand for high-level, qualified American Sign Language Interpreters.

1981:             Summer Education Program for Deaf and hard-of-hearing children was added.

Both The Lighthouse and CNYAHI continued to expand programming throughout the 1980s in response to changes in the laws and the emerging needs of people in our community.  The emphasis was then and is now to provide services that are personalized and enable the individuals we serve to remain in their homes, jobs and school environments, living as independently as possible.

1991:             AURORA of CNY is created through the merger of Syracuse Association of Workers for the Blind and the Central New York Association for the Hearing Impaired (CNYAHI).

During the 1990’s  AURORA thrived in the challenging and changing human service environment expanding  services in the counties of Cayuga, Onondaga, Oswego and Northern Cortland to  include: social work, employment services, orientation & mobility instruction, rehabilitation teaching, adaptive technology evaluation and training, low vision services, children’s instructional services, outreach and education, sign language instruction, and professional Sign Language Interpreting through the Marjorie Clere Interpreter Referral Services with a 14 upstate county reach).

These expansions were made possible through funding partnerships with  the Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped (now New York State Commission for the Blind), the United Ways of Central New York, Greater Oswego and Cayuga counties, Onondaga County Office for Aging, the Berthe Harder and Berenice Smith Foundations, the New York State Community Foundation and the Gifford Foundation along with hundreds of corporate donors and individual members.

19xx:             AURORA moved to its present location at 518 James Street

2000:             The start of the new millennium brought with it a shift in community-wide demographics and an increased demand for AURORA’s services.  Across our nation and in our community we know that by age 65, 1 out of every 3 individuals will have some degree of hearing loss that impacts their ability to function, while 1 out of every 6 will lose a significant degree of vision. Additionally, more babies are surviving earlier, premature birth than they did just a decade ago, with long term consequences contributing to vision/hearing loss.

 

2017:             AURORA celebrates 100 years and is poised to embark on exciting new ventures as an affiliated partner with Liberty Resources, Inc. to significantly expand our service lines and integrate a total health and well-being approach to services for people of all ages with vision and hearing loss.

Today, AURORA’s services include: social work, employment services, orientation & mobility instruction, rehabilitation teaching, adaptive technology evaluation and training, low vision services, children’s instructional services, sign language instruction, as well as professional Sign Language Interpreting through the Marjorie Clere Interpreter Referral Services.

The demand for AURORA’s services continues to grow.  As a result, we are committed to delivering the highest quality programs and services to meet the emerging needs of Central New Yorkers with vision and hearing loss.